Efficiency vs. Equality

~ Thursday, February 16 ~
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Is Harrisburg’s Nightmare America’s Future? (by ReasonTV)

Tags: reason default harrisburg PA wtf USA reed bankrupt
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~ Thursday, July 22 ~
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~ Saturday, July 17 ~
Permalink Tags: ban ecostalinists fish hamster pets san francisco wtf totalitarianism
~ Friday, July 16 ~
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(picture by Rosi)
Read it for yourself.

Her philosophy and implementation have faced some criticism. David Scott wrote that Mother Teresa  limited herself to keeping people alive rather than tackling poverty  itself.[35] She has also been criticized for her view on suffering: according to an  article in the Alberta Report, she felt that suffering would  bring people closer to Jesus.[36]



The quality of care offered to terminally ill patients in the Homes for  the Dying has been criticised in the medical press, notably The  Lancet and the British Medical  Journal, which reported the reuse of hypodermic needles, poor  living conditions, including the use of cold baths for all patients, and  an approach to illness and suffering that precluded the use of many  elements of modern medical care, such as systematic diagnosis.[37]


Dr. Robin Fox, editor of The  Lancet, described the medical care as “haphazard”, as volunteers  without medical knowledge had to take decisions about patient care,  because of the lack of doctors. He observed that her order did not  distinguish between curable and incurable patients, so that people who  could otherwise survive would be at risk of dying from infections and  lack of treatment.[38]


The spending of the charity money received has been criticized by some. Christopher Hitchens and the German  magazine Stern have said Mother Teresa did not  focus donated money on alleviating poverty or improving the conditions  of her hospices, but on opening new convents and increasing missionary  work.[49]

Read more: Mother Teresa

(picture by Rosi)

Read it for yourself.

Her philosophy and implementation have faced some criticism. David Scott wrote that Mother Teresa limited herself to keeping people alive rather than tackling poverty itself.[35] She has also been criticized for her view on suffering: according to an article in the Alberta Report, she felt that suffering would bring people closer to Jesus.[36]


The quality of care offered to terminally ill patients in the Homes for the Dying has been criticised in the medical press, notably The Lancet and the British Medical Journal, which reported the reuse of hypodermic needles, poor living conditions, including the use of cold baths for all patients, and an approach to illness and suffering that precluded the use of many elements of modern medical care, such as systematic diagnosis.[37]

Dr. Robin Fox, editor of The Lancet, described the medical care as “haphazard”, as volunteers without medical knowledge had to take decisions about patient care, because of the lack of doctors. He observed that her order did not distinguish between curable and incurable patients, so that people who could otherwise survive would be at risk of dying from infections and lack of treatment.[38]

The spending of the charity money received has been criticized by some. Christopher Hitchens and the German magazine Stern have said Mother Teresa did not focus donated money on alleviating poverty or improving the conditions of her hospices, but on opening new convents and increasing missionary work.[49]

Read more: Mother Teresa

Tags: mother teresa poverty suffering wtf do good do bad jesus religion believe india medical science charity sceptical criticism critical thinking
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~ Thursday, July 15 ~
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It may surprise you to learn, then, that in Lake Elmo, Minnesota, proprietors of a 40-year-old family farm that yields flowers, pumpkins and Christmas trees, are facing fines and 90-day jail sentences for attempting to sell their products in that town.  The reason?  Part of their farm lies outside city limits, and in Lake Elmo it’s illegal for farmers to sell products — even from their own land — unless they were grown within the city.  You can view a short video about their story here.

Free Trade Begins at Home | Cato @ Liberty

Tags: free trade video farmers jail setences wtf minnesota government cato procetctionism
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~ Sunday, July 11 ~
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Miron begins by toting up some of the principal costs of our anti-drug crusade. Government spends more than $33 billion annually on it. Arrests for drug-related infractions exceed 1.5 million per year. The United States now has well in excess of 300,000 people behind bars for drug violations. […]

For all our costly enforcement efforts, Miron shows that drug prohibition has little impact on the incidence of drug use, mainly because drug producers and sellers can evade law enforcement so easily. Yet the costs extend beyond the obvious ones already mentioned. One of them is increased racial tension because drug enforcement is so often targeted at minority areas.

Tags: drug war on drugs libertarian economics to read book review government wtf
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~ Saturday, July 10 ~
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reblogged via webbunny
~ Monday, July 5 ~
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